Tha Eastsidaz Welcome Tray Deee Home With The Trio’s First Single In Years (Video)

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Back in the 1990s, it was hard out here for a Snoop. Despite Snoop Dogg’s uber-solo success in Doggystyle and Tha Doggfather, the Long Beach legend had trouble building a group. Dating back to the late ’80s, Snoop’s 213 crew (with Nate Dogg and Warren G) was unable to strike a label deal until the mid-2000s, due to restrictive contracts and solo interests. Despite striking gold (or multi-platinum) in Tha Dogg Pound, Snoop was never an official member, stepping aside to let Daz Dillinger and Kurupt flourish as planned. The LBC Crew, a collective featuring Lil’ C-Style, Bad Azz, and Techniec also did not fare, getting “stranded on Death Row” after Snoop’s famed exodus to No Limit in early 1998.

That being said, Snoop bit at the chance soon after, in drafting Tha Eastsidaz. The collective included patiently-waiting O.G. Tray Deee as well as relative newcomer Goldie Locc, and with Battlecat production, the trio helped make Doggystyle Records (originally Dogg House) a famous imprint at the height of rapper-run labels.

After two albums, in 2000 and 2001, respectively, the group went to the wayside while more interests prevailed. Tray Deee, who released his own LP with some Dr. Dre production, served time soon after, while Goldie landed in another group.

With all three members active and at it again, the trio unites on “Can’t Trust Em.” With some grown-man talk in the Caddy, the song is in step with Tha Eastsidaz’ longtime stance of staying close to the homeboys, and avoiding anybody else in the circle. The rapping is strong, as is the wisdom, in a West Coast group’s triumphant return, courtesy of That’s My Work 4.

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