Do Remember: Kool G Rap & DJ Polo, Big Daddy Kane With Biz Markie’s Erase Racism Video

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For anybody with a pulse, this has been a difficult month. Regardless of political views, ethnic background, or age, the lives lost and the protest has been an awakening of the things America needs to address immediately, if we are to be a better, more loving, just, and harmonious nation.

With that said, it is appropriate to bring focus to a message from Hip-Hop that’s been echoing for nearly 25 years. While Kool G Rap’s more vicious verses, about sex, drugs, and violence are typically referenced in G Rap’s reign of hits, there is more to sift through. Kool G Rap & DJ Polo’s second of three albums together is 1990’s Wanted: Dead Or Alive. A Gangsta Rap album at its core, the Juice Crew MC was as raw as anything in Rap music when he delivered ferocious tracks such as “Talk Like Sex,” “Death Wish,” and “Money In The Bank.” However, perhaps it is that lucid rawness that allowed G Rap to unveil his deepest feelings on single, “Erase Racism.”

Co-produced and featuring Biz Markie (with Cool V), this song included Big Daddy Kane in uniting the races following the hate-crime murder of Yusef Hawkins in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn nearly six months prior to the album’s release. The single also praises President Nelson Mandela’s freedom, which had just occurred in the days prior to recording the track.

G Rap, Polo, Biz, and Kane wanted the world to love one another, regardless of skin tone and racial differences. While Biz’s  whimsical interpolation of Three Dog Night’s “Black And White” may have felt a little silly, the sentiments and heartfelt message of this track rang through. Take heed, 14 years later, as we all need to do our part to erase racism.

Check out other Ambrosia For Heads’ “Do Remember” pieces.

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