Lupe Fiasco’s Visual Is 9 Years Late, But Right On Time (Video)

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Hip-Hop Fans, we need your help...We recently launched AFH TV, a streaming video service focused on Hip-Hop culture. We already have exclusive interviews, documentaries, and rare freestyles featuring some of Rap’s most iconic artists and personalities. But, there is so much more to come--movies, TV series, talk shows--and we need your support to make it a reality. Please subscribe to AFH TV. It is only $1.99/month or $12/year, and offers 30-day free trials. Thank you.

Part of what made Lupe Fiasco’s 2006 Food & Liquor debut such a captivating album was its insightfulness. Although never an official single, “Just Might Be Okay” was a grabbing album cut. The Gemstones-assisted (t/k/a Gemini) joint was an examination of where Lu’ was at with his career in the moment, and the void he aimed to fill within Chicago’s diverse Rap scene, and beyond. Gem’s sung chorus offered hope to the world, and forecast change on the horizon.

Nine years later (to the month) since the acclaimed 1st & 15th album released, a video surfaces for “Just Might Be Okay.” The visual is non-traditional, but official – as shared by Lupe’s official page. Within, a lens captures Chicago today, with special attention paid to Fiasco’s West side of the city. The camera showcases the cultural diversity, strong work ethic, and pride of the communities. Skate shops, body shops, and restaurants are shown, along with some musical figures – including Crucial Conflict.

The civic symphony is closed with footage of protest beyond Chicago. With ongoing rallies and protest occupation in Baltimore, Maryland (following the death of Freddie Gray while in police custody) and elsewhere, this chorus, message, and visual may have started nearly a decade ago, but it resonates strongly in the now. Lu’ ends the moment with the following quote: “Revolution is hope for the hopeless.”

Do records like this take on new meaning when held up against events like those going on right now?

Related: Lupe Fiasco Says He Will Never Do Interviews After This. It’s a Great One (Video)