MC Breed & D.F.C.’s Anthem Against Frontin’ Had A Message That Resonates Into The Future (Videos)

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By the early 1990s, Rap music thrived when it surrounded itself with themes of hard times. Flint, Michigan was an epicenter for a changing economy, addiction, poverty, and crime. Independently, Flint’s MC Breed & DFC stepped forth with a self-titled album that had lots to say. 1991’s Ichiban-distributed MC Breed & D.F.C. would tackle the Top 200, with a fast-rappin’ MC who evaded coastal identity in a diversifying Hip-Hop landscape. With songs like “Job Corps,” “Better Terms,” and “Guanja,” the MC born Eric Breed was easy to relate to, especially for have-not’s tryna’ have.

Single “Ain’t No Future In Yo Frontin'” would be the vessel to push Breed over the top. Among the first (and best) to sample Ohio Players’ “Funky Worm,” Breed (who also produced the track) altered the record in a way that gave it speed and depth. Whereas the Players’ slowly brought the erotic breakdown to life, Breed made it a chest-thumping call to action. With that backdrop, an MC from a cutthroat place rapped about how honesty, slow-and-steady wins. Fronters, jackers, takers, and toys were not going to win in the end. In a 1991 that produced Rap superstars in Vanilla Ice, MC Hammer, and others—while talent was arguably being overlooked, the message applied to music, business, and life.

For the rare video (which featured two versions), it was straightforward: gold-toothed rappin’, DJ’in’, and dancin’. However, for 1991 style, fashion, and flavor, this Hollywood-themed visual works.

Here is the alternate version:

After “Ain’t No Future…” took off, Breed was an early collaborator with the likes of Tupac and Warren G, and took on The D.O.C. as a mentor. With all of his brethren, the MC managed to spread his sound and show the value in working with like-minded individuals. In his case, that meant purveyors of Funk through Hip-Hop. In later years, Breed would team with fellow Michigan Rap stars Insane Clown Posse.

Sadly, after releasing 14 studio albums—six of which charted in the Top 200—MC Breed died in 2008. The cause of death was said to be kidney failure.

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