Diamond D’s Forgotten Stunts, Blunts & Hip-Hop Video Features Bars & Quality Cameos

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In 1992, Diamond D & The Psychotic Neurotics released debut album Stunts, Blunts and Hip Hop. The Chemistry/Mercury Records effort is remembered as a Rap classic, not only for its stellar production, but elite MC’ing. The album featured involvement from Brand Nubian, Large Professor, and Q-Tip, as well as Fatman Scoop, Big L, and 45 King.

In many ways, S.B.a.H.H.‘s commercial success fails to measure against its impact. Diamond was signed to Mercury, a label that had achieved groundbreaking success with Kurtis Blow a decade earlier, but struggled in the early 1990s market—despite a gifted roster. With that, some of the jewels contained in Stunts… are lost on the masses.

One is third single, “F**k What U Heard.” Featuring Brand Nu’s Sadat X (who Diamond is fully collaborating with 23 years later), the song had a title and chorus that wasn’t fit for radio. Its bars and incredible self-produced beat, however, were. The apocalyptic video features Diamond and Derek X in the lair. Keen eyes can catch a hair-headed Fat Joe, or a white-capped Big L. Look closer and you may see more Hip-Hop producers. The video is simple, extremely early ’90s (in fashion and presentation), but shows what’s magical about a passed over single on a great album. Before Diggin’ In The Crates was a proven royal family in Hip-Hop production and lyricism, this visual shows a tight unit, and a time in Hip-Hop that is deeply missed by today’s standards.

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Had Diamond D signed with Def Jam, Tommy Boy, or another large label in the ’90s, would Stunts, Blunts be gold?

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