Pimp C, Nas & Juicy J Take TLC’s What About Your Friends And Make It TRILL (Audio)

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Hi. We recently created AFH TV, Ambrosia For Heads’ streaming video service, because we believe real Hip-Hop deserves its own dedicated TV home. But, there are doubters, so, we need your help. If you have enjoyed anything on AFH over the last 7 years, we are asking you to subscribe to AFH TV. It is only $1.99/month or $12/year, and already features some amazing content, but the best is yet to come. Thank you for all of your support.

At the end of his life, Pimp C made no secrets about his unhappiness with the industry, and some of the folks in his circle. While Chad Butler and Bernard Freeman (a/k/a Bun B) maintained a brotherly bond in UGK that lasted nearly 20 years, other folks in Pimp C’s life seemingly cared less when the Port Arthur, Texas MC/producer was locked up, battling demons, or just trying to work at his accustomed high level. Perhaps it is in this mind state that he recorded “Friends.” The song is a posthumous inclusion on December 4’s Long Live The Pimp album.

The chorus takes a healthy hit of inspiration from TLC’s timeless hit “What About Your Friends” and flips it in a Pimp C way. Meanwhile, the longtime Rap-A-Lot Records artist’s verse calls Whodini’s own “Friends” into play.

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Related: Pimp C’s Diverse Musical Talents & Mental Health Struggles Remembered in His Definitive Biography (Interview)

With the album coming on Mass Appeal Records, who better than Nas to enter the mix. Nasir Jones has made plenty of songs in his 20-plus-year career that question loyalty, take audit or a circle, and hint at isolation. From “Hate Me Now” to “Take It In Blood,” Nasty Nas knows what he’s doing, and shows this Pimp C moment the care it seemingly deserves. Also on board is longtime UGK/Pimp collaborator Juicy J. The Juice man has also lived through it in his own 20-year career, replacing Three 6 Mafia ties with Taylor Gang, and presumably dealing with lots of turmoil, whether in Memphis, Tennessee or Hollywood, California.

This power-collabo (spotted at Pitchfork) just works.

In what is believed to be Pimp C’s final posthumous release, will you support?

Related: Pimp C’s Latest Posthumous Single Is Still Years Ahead Of Its Time (Audio)