Tupac Left Prison A Superstar On A Vendetta. Gucci Mane Uses Him For Inspiration (Audio)

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In the last year of his life, Tupac Shakur left Clinton Correctional Facility to claim the pole position in Rap music. While Me Against The World would go to #1 when ‘Pac was incarcerated, his 1996 follow-up All Eyez On Me, is the (diamond-certified) double album he is largely remembered for. Upon release, Shakur signed with Death Row Records to work with an all-star roster of talent, enjoy a very public life of celebrity, and drench the music industry in controversy, vitriol, and an onslaught of anthems.

Gucci Mane has had some of the highest profile legal troubles in Rap throughout the last decade. Once one of the genre’s biggest stars (via mixtapes), the Warner Bros. Records artist has had more than four isolated incidents with the law since 2013. In the wake of his arrests and incarcerations, the 1017 Brick Squad founder lost his freedom, much of his crew, and his position as one of the hottest hit-makers.

Why Tupac’s All Eyez On Me Remains The First & Last Flawed Classic Album

The Atlanta, Georgia-based star has been out of prison just five weeks, following a May, 2014 firearm sentence. When he released “First Day Out The Feds,” it was clear that the onetime Tommy Boy Records artist had a mission—to restore his place near the top, and squash the competition. In furthering that agenda, who better to use than Tupac?

“On Me” features an innovative sample of Ohio Players’ “Funky Worm” for a fresh-from-prison verbal attack that takes no prisoners. “La Flare” works in a verse that ‘Pac Heads may know from Better Dayz, Tha Outlawz-featuring “Fuck ‘Em All.” Recorded at a time when Pac was especially fired up, the peeled off verse is uncut inspiration for another complicated lyricist, who has a polarizing relationship with listeners.

All Eyez Can Watch A Trailer To Tupac Shakur’s Biopic (Video)

Posthumous, re-purposed Tupac Shakur verses have also appeared on high-profile albums by Bun B and Ja Rule.

This song is believed to be an inclusion on Guc’s Everybody Looking album (July 22).