Saigon & Termanology Put Prejudice Policing In Its Place Over Q-Tip Production (Audio)

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A decade ago, Termanology and Saigon were two of the rising stars in the New York Hip-Hop scene. While Term’ would begin a relentless cycle of independent releases that has lasted well into today, Saigon would ink a major label deal with Atlantic Records and get to work on a focused album (The Greatest Story Never Told) it would take more than five years to release.

Despite those differing trajectories, both MCs stayed highly relevant through skill and substance. These lyricists chose harder roads, committed to their messages and styles of music-making. Having worked together before, on “We’re Both Wrong,” the lyrical half of 1982 and “Sai-Giddy” come together for a song that is extremely topical, and necessary at this time especially.

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Producer Q-Tip chops down a melodic Soul vocal, with a loop that allows the MCs to shine. Saigon goes first with his cross-examination of police that simply want to see people of color in iron cages. As he has done on so many issues, the Abandoned Nation MC makes his argument precise and poignant. Term’ follows, making a rally-cry to the people who are not paying attention to the greater issues—because they are trapped in a system. As enduring Rap music should do, this song raises conversation, eyebrows, and hopefully the volume on your speakers.

Texas State Trooper Brian Encinia’s recorded dialog to Sandra Bland in the introd makes this song especially chilly—in a week where Alton Sterling was killed at the hands of Baton Rouge, Louisiana police.

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This is an inclusion from the upcoming More Politics album, a sequel to 2008 break-out Politics As Usual. That LP featured all-star production by DJ Premier, Pete Rock, Havoc, Large Professor, Hi-Tek, Buckwild, Easy Mo Bee, Nottz, and Alchemist.