Snoop Dogg DJs A 2 Hour Tribute Mix For 20 Years Of “Tha Doggfather”

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This weekend, Snoop Dogg’s sophomore album Tha Doggfather celebrated its 20th anniversary. The LP was significant in Snoop’s career in that it was his first foray without mentor Dr. Dre behind the boards, and it would be his final Death Row Records release while still at the then reigning label.

The LP would debut at #1 and achieve double platinum status. Snoop, who was acquitted of murder charges earlier in 1996, had tamed much of Gangsta Rap content to a more love and Funk-driven message. The singles maintained Snoop’s appreciate for the past, with “Snoop’s Upside Ya Head” covering The Gap Band, and featuring the MC’s uncle Charlie Wilson (who fronted the original). In the way that “Lodi Dodi” had recreated a Slick Rick and Doug E. Fresh classic on Doggystyle, “Vapors” did the same of Biz Markie’s early hit. Snoop used the song to tell the rags-to-riches stories of Warren G, Nate Dogg, and Daz Dillinger, as well as his own. Without Dre at Death Row anymore, and reportedly delayed in beginning the album with Snoop, another 1980s Compton Hip-Hop legend was brought in at the helm. DJ Pooh, known for his work with Ice Cube, LL Cool J, and King T oversaw much of production—as well as Daz (who became Death Row’s music head in Dre’s absence), Sam Sneed, Soopafly, and L.T. Hutton. Non-label guests included Too Short, one of Snoop’s biggest influences. Warren G, who had previously experienced problems with Death Row (leading him to sign with Def Jam Records/Rush Associated labels) also returned for a vocal appearance. In 1996 is the same period in time when Snoop—with Tha Dogg Pound cemented—began promoting latest protegees Tray Deee (of Da Eastsidaz and LBC Crew), Bad Azz, Lil C-Style, and Techniec.

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Although Tha Doggfather is not Snoop’s most revered LP or his best-selling, the Hip-Hop legend honored his baby. Jumping behind the turntables (as Snoopadelic), the Long Beach, California native played some of the music that inspired him at that time.

The nearly two-hour mix features music by Faze-O, James Brown, Doug E. Fresh & Slick Rick, Run-D.M.C., Jackson 5, and Blowfly. Naturally, Heads get some Gap Band too.

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#BonusBeat: The rare “Roc Remix” of “Snoop Bounce” from Tha Doggfather era featuring the musicians of Rage Against The Machine. This was released on Death Row’s Greatest Hits compilation for Snoop several years after: