Redman Is Back Behind The Boards. This Gilla House Track Has Red’s Bars & Beat (Audio)

Hi. We recently created AFH TV, Ambrosia For Heads’ streaming video service, because we believe real Hip-Hop deserves its own dedicated TV home, but we need your help to make it great. Please subscribe to AFH TV. It is only $1.99/month or $12/year, and already features some amazing content, but the best is yet to come. Thank you for all of your support.
Hi. We recently created AFH TV, Ambrosia For Heads’ streaming video service, because we believe real Hip-Hop deserves its own dedicated TV home, but we need your help to make it great. Please subscribe to AFH TV. It is only $1.99/month or $12/year, and already features some amazing content, but the best is yet to come. Thank you for all of your support.

While Redman’s rapping abilities are nearly impossible to miss, people tend to overlook Reggie Noble’s production. The artist who began as a DJ for Lords Of The Underground’s DoItAll evolved from turntables to beat machines. While closely tied to Erick Sermon and Rockwilder, Redman is credited with producing (at least in part) songs such as “Tonight’s Da Night,” “Rockafella,” “It’s Like That (My Big Brother),” and “Da Goodness.” While Red’ largely sat out from the beats on last year’s Mudface, he remains active, producing for his crew.

Check out Red’ and Gilla House’s Ready Roc and Runt Dawg on a high-energy banger. “Hustler” is produced by the Funk Doctor Spock himself, off Runt’s upcoming debut, ItsMrWilliams2U (December 23). As its title alludes, the track is testament to the rappers’ entrepreneurial spirits. Runt raps on pushing everything from “sticks and Tussionex” to “DVDs, white Ts, incense and Percocets.” Meanwhile, Roc makes the point that if pressed, he’d peddle bootleg CDs. Redman, on the other hand, approaches the concept less literally—spitting bars about his music grind: “While you at home puttin’ coke through a strainer, I’m on tour entertaining strangers.

Masta Killa Is Releasing A New Album. Method Man & Redman Join Him On His 1st Single (Audio)

In other news, Redman recently sat down with his fellow New Jersey Hip-Hop native Heather B on “The Happy Hour” for Soul Food Thursdays to discuss healthy eating, his on-stage energy (inspired by Run-D.M.C., Busta Rhymes, and De La Soul) and what keeps him going as an artist. The Def Squad MC also briefly updates on some future releases, confirming an independent Muddy Waters 2 for 2017. Reggie also cements a third Blackout! installment with Method Man in the closing seconds of the interview.

However, what Heads may find most interesting is Redman reflecting on his 1994 sophomore album, Dare Iz A Darkside. Heather B asks the MC/producer/DJ if he considered stepping away from Rap, following some criticism of the largely self-produced, drug-induced Def Jam Records release.

Masta Killa Is Releasing A New Album. Method Man & Redman Join Him On His 1st Single (Audio)

Dare Iz A Darkside, I was just high as hell. [That period] is when Keith Murray came to Def Squad. Yo, we was just wildin’!” Redman says with a beaming smile. He references a specific drug that played a role in the recording. “It was that bombaze! [Laughs] On Dare Iz A Darkside, I was smokin’ dust on that shit, but not the whole album though. But, you know, it was the bombaze; mothafuckas ain’t what what that [even was]. It wasn’t that like, I wanted to give up [Rap] because a lot of my fans didn’t receive [the album] well. What came to find out [was] the fans did receive it well. A lot of females…more females came up to me about Dare Iz A Darkside than any of my albums. I thought that was the weirdest shit in the world. I did kinda feel [different]. Hey, I did this album by myself; I did the production on that album.”

Here, Redman explains making lifestyle changes in recording his third album, which turned 20 years old this month. “When I did Muddy Waters, it was just kind of an enlightening. Like, okay, I know I went too gritty, too far, too hard on Dare Iz A Darkside. I’m becoming more of a man, more of an established artist, this Muddy Waters album shows my balance now. I’m breaking out. I’m taking care of my body now. No more of the bullshit; I left the [angel dust] alone. New life. But I never felt like I should stop or switch modes ’cause of Dare Iz A Darkside. I just thought it was real dark [thus the name]. I honestly didn’t think that a lot of people would receive it well. But after hearing [about] it through the years, it’s like, ‘Wow, that goes down as a classic too.’ ‘Cause that’s the least album I like, besides the Reggie album I threw to Def Jam just to get off of them.”

Earlier this year, Redman unveiled a new group, 1000Volts, with DJ Jayceeoh.

Additional reporting by Bandini.