Freddie Gibbs Makes It Through The Fire Only To Get Locked Up (Video)

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In the months since his September acquittal of sexual-assault charges, Freddie Gibbs has shared very personal details about his legal nightmare with fans. After being accused of forcibly engaging in sexual acts with a woman in Vienna, Austria, Gibbs was imprisoned for months, thousands of miles away from any family or support system. Coupled with an impenetrable language barrier, his experience tossed him into depths of isolation but like many Hip-Hop artists before him, he used much of his time locked up writing the music that would become his redemption songs.

Freddie Gibbs Details The Nightmare Of Being Falsely Accused Of Sexual Assault (Video)

“Crushed Glass,” a single Gibbs released in March, tackled the pain of being falsely accused. It served as the lead single to his latest album, You Only Live 2wice, an LP entirely inspired by his unfathomable ordeal. Prior to its release, the Gary, Indiana rapper told Complex “I pretty much wrote everything in my cell in Austria. I just wrote things down, wrote ideas, because I didn’t think that I was gonna be able to rap again. You just never know man, so I just wrote a lot of sh*t. And when I got home I got production and just went in and pieced it together like a seamstress. Everything that I wanted to say I got it all out in this project. And I think that’s why this was so significant for me.”

One of the album’s standout tracks is “Andrea,” a record celebrating the path to success offered up by a life of crime. The song’s title is code for “White girl,” itself a street term for cocaine. Turning his trapping into rapping, Gibbs is well known for his gritty portrayal of a street-hustler’s life, trading a life of drug dealing for a life of record selling. With his life’s most daunting legal woes now in his rearview (ironically entirely unrelated to selling drugs) Gibbs reflects on the crimes of his past and how “Andrea” has made his current success possible, all the while acknowledging the wrong he had to do to get where he is today.

In the song’s video released today (June 27), Gibbs literally drives through the fire, cruising along a winding road before reaching an inferno. Rich in metaphor, the mini-movie plays with themes of freedom, obstacle, and resurrection. Just when it seems he’s managed to leave his previous life behind him, an unexpected detour presents itself, leading him to what threatens to be a dead end for his career and his ability to provide for his family. In the video’s second half, Gibbs finds himself in a prison cell staring directly at the toilet right next to his bed (“Momma always told me ‘n***a, go and get your own sh*t’/
Toilet right next to my bed, I’m sleeping by my own sh*t”).

Directed by Eric Nelson, the video was written and conceptualized by Ben “Lambo” Lambert, Gibbs, and Nelson.