2 Years After PumpkinHead Passed, A New Video Highlights His Undying Wisdom

Hi. We recently created AFH TV, Ambrosia For Heads’ streaming video service, because we believe real Hip-Hop deserves its own dedicated TV home. But, there are doubters, so, we need your help. If you have enjoyed anything on AFH over the last 7 years, we are asking you to subscribe to AFH TV. It is only $1.99/month or $12/year, and already features some amazing content, but the best is yet to come. Thank you for all of your support.
Hi. We recently created AFH TV, Ambrosia For Heads’ streaming video service, because we believe real Hip-Hop deserves its own dedicated TV home. But, there are doubters, so, we need your help. If you have enjoyed anything on AFH over the last 7 years, we are asking you to subscribe to AFH TV. It is only $1.99/month or $12/year, and already features some amazing content, but the best is yet to come. Thank you for all of your support.

On June 9, 2015 Robert “PumpkinHead” Diaz died. The Brooklyn, New Yorker had risen the ranks as a battle MC and was well underway into a discography that showed personal depth and creativity.

His Rawkus Records-involved Orange Moon Over Brooklyn album with producer Marco Polo was a tremendous late entry in the Underground Hip-Hop canon. He was co-piloting the Brooklyn Academy group, while also running closely with Jean Grae and Immortal Technique. P.H. was respected in his network, but like so many MCs in the 2000s, wanted a bigger stage and larger crowds at a time when Hip-Hop seemed to be moving online.

On 2015, P.H. passed. The cause of death was never made public. In his Park Slope section of B.K., a street was dedicated to him. Friends and allies, including Talib Kweli, have kept his name alive.

Do Remember: Pumpkinhead’s “Emcee” (Audio)

PumpkinHead is still giving fans game though. On The Snowgoons’ Goon Bap album released last year, the project closes with “My Advice.” Within, P.H. tells those following a Hip-Hop dream in his footsteps about the pitfalls and triumphs. From battling to treating B-girls with equal respect, the song unravels the journey of an artist who claimed to have met Tupac and collaborated with Sean Price. While he acknowledges his greatness in terms of skill, the verses also touch upon the point P.H. was trying to reach. This is heartfelt Hip-Hop for anybody who follows dreams, passion, and great spitters.

The simple but effective video shows handheld camera at the Brooklyn street.