Rapsody Shows There’s More Worth In Rapping For Live Presidents (Audio)

Hi. We recently created AFH TV, Ambrosia For Heads’ streaming video service, because we believe real Hip-Hop deserves its own dedicated TV home. But, there are doubters, so, we need your help. If you have enjoyed anything on AFH over the last 7 years, we are asking you to subscribe to AFH TV. It is only $1.99/month or $12/year, and already features some amazing content, but the best is yet to come. Thank you for all of your support.
Hi. We recently created AFH TV, Ambrosia For Heads’ streaming video service, because we believe real Hip-Hop deserves its own dedicated TV home. But, there are doubters, so, we need your help. If you have enjoyed anything on AFH over the last 7 years, we are asking you to subscribe to AFH TV. It is only $1.99/month or $12/year, and already features some amazing content, but the best is yet to come. Thank you for all of your support.

For the third week in a row, Rapsody has set free another potent example of her virtuosity as an MC. The Snow Hill, North Carolina Roc Nation signee (and Jamla roster member) has been celebrating #JamRocFridays, a series of releases which, by all outward appearances, seem to be in anticipation of a full-fledged project.

Rapsody Shows Once Again That Few MCs Can Hang With Her Whether Male Of Female (Audio)

The latest is “O.L.M.S” (Obama Like My Sh*t), which comes with some timely, politically leaning artwork. Sonically, this is one of Rap’s most lush backdrops, with a beat change, singing, and an extended intro all helping to add layers to #JamRocFridays’ coup de grace. The talents responsible for the beat are The Soul Council’s Eric G and Kashif. “I walk in the White House with a strut like George Jefferson/Looking at George and Jefferson, look at us now/Having round tables is power moves you don’t see around/It’s just us talking justice, the POTUS been down,” she raps about the unprecedented access Barack Obama gave Blacks to the White House. Later, she cites the former President respect for her work. “Ain’t gotta say but four words: Obama like my shit.” On the hook, a vocalist sings “they don’t know what we go through, they don’t show what we gonna do, and they don’t care what we goin’ through,” lending elements of 19th-century spiritual music, similar to characteristics on Kanye West’s College Dropout.

With references to Bill Cosby, South African apartheid, Birdman, Michael Keaton, Tony Hawk, and more, “O.L.M.S.” is a rich and robust offering from one of Rap’s dopest.