Don Flamingo’s Vibrant Depiction Of New Orleans Gives Hope For Cities Devastated By Hurricanes (Video)

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Hi. We recently created AFH TV, Ambrosia For Heads’ streaming video service, because we believe real Hip-Hop deserves its own dedicated TV home. But, there are doubters, so, we need your help. If you have enjoyed anything on AFH over the last 7 years, we are asking you to subscribe to AFH TV. It is only $1.99/month or $12/year, and already features some amazing content, but the best is yet to come. Thank you for all of your support.

The legacy of New Orleans’ Bounce movement during the late ’90s through mid-2000s still heavily overshadows several of the city’s imitable rappers’ individual contributions to Hip-Hop lyricism (i.e. Lil Wayne, Curren$y, Jay Electronica, among others). Having vital co-signs from NYC legends The Lox and JAY-Z, Don Flamingo is coming up big in 2017 for The Big Easy.

In his “Ya Heard Me” video, the Roc Nation signee takes the viewer on a journey detailing the underbelly of the crime-filled 504. Before the bass-driven production kicks in, the visual shows Don Flamingo sitting next to a distressed youngster. They’re on a bench offering his knowledge and advising him to keep his head up before setting off on his own trail with his vivid portrayals of the city’s street culture. Aerial views of the city’s landscape, a N’awlins street brass band, a funeral, and Don Flamingo’s crew bring the darkened energy away far from the city’s tourist attractive party life.

The lyrics and backdrop parallel JAY-Z’s “Where I’m From” off his album In My Lifetime: Vol. 1 released in 1997. “From the School of Hard Knocks where the subject is hard rocks / And put money and sock drawers for the drops like bald spots,” and “Tap Buddha outside as we set the line for the dead / No need for hearses, we dash and carry caskets over our heads” are in his first verse which ends by him saying “My city is one of a kind, dog / It’s New Orleans, The Big Easy, just thought I’d remind y’all.

Don Flamingo Has Co-Signs From Jay-Z & The LOX Because He’s That Good (Video)

The chorus features a Nas sample, which also shows Don Flamingo’s respect for New York Hip-Hop, and contains his punchline-filled bars to show his pedigree among the best lyricists in this era of Rap. This belongs to Don’s upcoming Race To Power EP, coming September 15.