Joyner Lucas’ Video Shows The Raw Dialogue That Needs To Happen Between Blacks & Whites

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Hi. We recently created AFH TV, Ambrosia For Heads’ streaming video service, because we believe real Hip-Hop deserves its own dedicated TV home, but we need your help to make it great. Please subscribe to AFH TV. It is only $1.99/month or $12/year, and already features some amazing content, but the best is yet to come. Thank you for all of your support.

Joyner Lucas is one of the most cutting-edge MCs to emerge in recent years. The Worcester, Massachusetts native was strongly co-signed by Busta Rhymes, a few years ago. In June, the past BET Hip Hop Cypher participant released 508-507-2209. However, he keeps dropping technically-advanced, thought-provoking bars.

Video “I’m Not Racist” is a grabbing example. With Joyner’s pen creating the conversation, the MC stages a conversation between a white male “Make America Great Again” red-cap wearer and a Black man representative of the Hip-Hop generation. They begin seated across the table, but as each states his perspective on race relations in America, it gets incredibly heated and really raw.

The white character begins, mouthing the lyrics that come from Lucas’ rap. He tells the Black man across the table, “Music rot in your brain and slowly start to convince you / Then you let your kids listen and the cycle continues / Blame it all on the menu, blame it on those drinks, blame it on everybody except for your own race / Blame it on white privileges, blame it on white kids, and just blame it on white citizens—same with the vice president / Bunch of class clowns / Ni**as kneelin’ on the field, that’s a flag down / How dare you try to make demands for this money? / You gon’ show us some respect, you gon’ stand for this country, ni**a! / I’m not racist, I’m just prepared for this type of war / I heard Eminem’s rap at the awards, who’s he fightin’ for? / Y’all can take that motherf*cker too, he ain’t white no more / It’s like you wanna be so famous, you’ll do anything for attention and a little payment / I can’t take you nowhere without people pointin’ fingers / Pants hangin’ off your ass, you ain’t got no home-trainin’ / Put your f*ckin’ pants up, ni**a!” Earlier in the verse, the character denies he’s a racist, and points to Black in-laws in his family as justification.

The Black character speaks next. “With all disrespect, I don’t really like you white motherf*ckers, that sh*t’s where I’m at / Screaming ‘All Lives Matter’ is a protest to my protest, what kind of sh*t is that? / And that’s one war you’ll never win / The power in the word ‘ni**a’ is a different sin / We shouldn’t say it but we do, and that sh*t’s what it is / But that don’t mean that you can say it just ’cause you got ni**a friends / The word was originated for you to keep us under / When we use it, that’s just how we greet each other / And when you use it, we know there’s a double-meaning under,” begins the second verse. The following bars go point-for-point against the first verse, from Eminem’s BET Hip Hop cypher performance to tax cuts to building a wall on the US/Mexico border. “You worry about your life, so you take mine / I love you, but I f*ckin’ hate you at the same time / I wish we could trade shoes so we could change lives / So we could understand each other more, but that’ll take time / I’m not racist.

In an America divided, Joyner Lucas’ latest music not only clears the table, it knocks it over. He previously showed great visual concept in “Keep It 100” from 508-507-2209.