The Pharcyde Release A Deluxe Edition Of Their Debut Album With 16 Bonus Songs (Audio)

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Hi. We recently created AFH TV, Ambrosia For Heads’ streaming video service, because we believe real Hip-Hop deserves its own dedicated TV home. But, there are doubters, so, we need your help. If you have enjoyed anything on AFH over the last 7 years, we are asking you to subscribe to AFH TV. It is only $1.99/month or $12/year, and already features some amazing content, but the best is yet to come. Thank you for all of your support.

Next week (November 24) marks 25 years since The Pharcyde released debut album Bizarre Ride II The Pharcyde. With that milestone, a new “deluxe edition” box-set emerges to celebrate the gold-certified Delicious Vinyl LP with 16 bonus songs.

Crate Recordings assembles the material, which is available for stream (below). The vinyl and CD components follow this Friday (November 17). The packaging also contains the supplemental materials, in addition to the original ’92 LP. Additional tracks include B-side “Pork” and “Panty Raid” (which first appeared on the 2001 best-of compilation). There are also live performances and a plethora of remixes from Jay, Swift, and others. Liner notes are contributed by journalist and Passion Of The Weiss founder Jeff Weiss.

Previously, Boston-based Get On Down Records released the singles from the same album on colored vinyl and included a custom-made music box.

The Pharcyde has been fractured for much of the last decade. While Fatlip and Slimkid3 regularly perform together, Bootie and Imani released additional material under the name. Earlier this year, Fatlip released a video with Percee P and Phil Da Agony for producer Tone Spliff.

During 2015-2016’s “Finding The GOAT Album” competition, this is what Ambrosia For Heads said of Bizarre Ride II The Pharcyde: In the post-N.W.A. Los Angeles, California, MCs all seemed to embrace the vigilante lifestyle of gang-infested streets, colorful cars, shapely women, and bubonic chronic. From the same streets of South Central as Ice Cube and WC, The Pharcyde had defiantly different things to say. Fatlip, Tre Hardson, Bootie Brown, and Imani emerged as a quartet of MCs who needed charisma to stand out—not only in a crowded industry but from each other. Debut Bizarre Ride II The Pharcyde best manifested the group’s frontier terrain in Hip-Hop. However, in standing apart from the pack, the ‘Cyde came to the front. Whereas most MCs made songs about easily obtained sexual partners, the Delicious Vinyl pack mastered the unrequited vibe on crossover single “Passin’ Me By.” But The Pharcyde refused to be pigeonholed as woe-is-me punks. “I’m That Type Of Ni**a” played like a ’92 Juice Crew posse cut—had Kane and his cohorts huffed nitrous balloons. Hi-pitched and fast-paced, The Pharcyde were deeply confident MCs, as a product of their reigning status in L.A.’s famed The Good Life Cafe cyphers.

Like their Freestyle Fellowship affiliates, The Pharcyde found a way to work in harmony. The group exercised routines that had more in common with Cold Crush Brothers than Cypress Hill. “Ya Mama” posed immaturity with refined craft. The group offered snaps, with air-tight raps to drive the theme home for skeptics. While recreational drug use was becoming a dominant theme in Rap, nationwide in 1992, “Pack The Pipe” was an accurate portrayal of getting a little too lifted. Part actors (just as some of the members were in real life), The Pharcyde proved to be especially devoted to each album concept. They genuinely sold the ideas, more than simply stacking 16’s on a particular issue or topic. Surrounding the four creatives, the group—along with affiliates L.A. Jay and J-Swift brought a cohesive sound to Bizarre. The album integrated Jazz, but not in an overt way akin to Digable Planets or US3. Instead, the group adapted the free-form attitudes and bold experimentation, with the perfect backdrop of diced down Donald Byrd, Quincy Jones, Roy Ayers, and others. Although the cooperative energy of the early ’90s lives strong on the debut album, The Pharcyde’s message has enriched with time—from the relationship raps to the eerily relevant “Mr. Officer.” Bizarre Ride To The Pharcyde lives up to its name 23 years later in the fact that the now-fractured L.A. quartet created an experience, that was both amusing and informative, and could never be duplicated elsewhere.