This Mash-Up Mix Takes A Midnight Maraud With 36 Chambers (Audio)

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Yesterday (November 9), Hip-Hop Heads celebrated the 25th birthdays of two landmark albums: A Tribe Called Quest’s third LP, Midnight Marauders and Wu-Tang Clan’s Enter The Wu-Tang (36 Chambers). On 11-9-93, many fans were eager to digest LPs that were likely shipped together from the same RCA Records distributor.

Although these two crews did championship round battle in Ambrosia For Heads‘ annual (and recently concluded) “Finding The GOAT” tournament focusing on Rap groups, one DJ found a great way to celebrate them together. DJ Filthy Rich made A Tribe Called Wu: Enter The Marauders. While other mashups have examined the quartet from Queens alongside the brothers from Brooklyn and Shaolin in the past, this is likely the first to ever exclusively blend these two classic LPs with the same born day.

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“The intent was not to improve on the originals in any way…that would be impossible, as I consider them both to be perfect bodies of work. Rather, it was about orchestrating a fun concept, and putting a totally new spin on these well-worn classics,” Filthy Rich said in a statement. “The contrast of Wu’s gritty street raps over Ali Shaheed’s jazzy production works in a pleasantly unexpected way.”

The mix shows Rich’s adoration with both albums. Each ’93 LP is remembered from its interludes (in the case of Tribe) and skits (for Wu). Those worlds seamlessly collide on the intro, letting listeners know that this mixmaster has given this thematic mix some thought. He celebrates then often under-recognized self-production from Tribe while pairing it with Wu’s witty-unpredictable, and inventive lyricism.

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As the tracklist (embedded below) suggests, the beats from A.T.C.Q may not seem like they’d match the Wu, but with careful selection, it’s pleasant to the ear. “Da Mystery Of Chess Boxin'” against “Electric Relaxation,” “C.R.E.A.M” lyrics paired with the instrumental to “Award Tour,” and “Tearz” heartfelt lyrics against the sample-stacked world of Tribe’s “Clap Your Hands” are great examples.

Yesterday, Wu-Tang Clan released its documentary, Wu-Tang Is For The Children. Largely in celebration of the classic debut, the film can be streamed on AFH.