A Short Film Shows What The Fresh Prince Of Bel-Air Would Look Like In 2019

Hip-Hop Fans, please subscribe to AFH TV, a streaming video service focused on real Hip-Hop culture. We already have exclusive interviews, documentaries, and rare freestyles featuring some of Rap’s most iconic artists and personalities, and much more is coming--movies, TV series, talk shows. We need your support. It is only $1.99/month or $12/year, and is available on iOS, Android, Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire and Google TV, for all subscribers. Start your 7-day free trial now. Thank you.

Next year, The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air turns 30 years old. It’s been nearly three decades since Will Smith introduced America to a fictionalized version of himself, playing a West Philadelphia-native who gets relocated to Bel Air, California to stay out of trouble and live with his extended family. During the show’s six-season run, audiences laughed, cried, and fell in love with characters like Alfonso Ribeiro’s “Carlton Banks,” and James Avery as “Uncle Phil.” Although it is now 2019, the sitcom’s influence, humor, and style still bleed throughout most mass media.

However, one fan-made film begs the question: If The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air were to debut in today’s climate, how would that feel? Sun Squared Media steps up to the plate to answer, as writer, director, and cinematographer Morgan Cooper, along with actor Jerry Madison who plays “Will Smith,” re-imagines the sitcom as a gritty, mature comedy-drama simply titled Bel-Air.

DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince’s Vintage Freestyle Is An MC & DJ Hallmark (Audio)

Cinematic music choice aside, this Bel-Air re-imagining captures a direction and tone similar to FX’ Atlanta. After a scuffle on the basketball court, “Will” gets caught with a gun by the local police, and is sent to live in Bel Air with his “Uncle Phil” to clean up and stay out of trouble. Viewers are given a glimpse of newness as “Will’s” character stands outside the mansion gates, coolly wearing a “What Would Meek Do?” hoodie. We’re introduced to all sorts of drama, showing scenes with “Carlton,” a supportive “Aunt Vivian,” and a slick “Jazz,” who meets our main character at a record store.

Fan-made film or not, a gritty Bel-Air reboot might have something we’ve needed for a long time.