Spread Love The Brooklyn Way. A Street Is Named After Biggie Smalls (Video)

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Just over 47 years ago, on May 21, 1972, Christopher Wallace was born at St. Mary’s Hospital in Brooklyn, New York. As a youth, Wallace was raised by his mother, Voletta, a preschool teacher, at 226 St. James Place in Clinton Hill. From his booming stage entrance during a pivotal Big Daddy Kane concert alongside Mister Cee to the Source Awards podium, Biggie Smalls seemingly took Brooklyn with him.

In honor and celebration of the late Christopher Wallace and his aforementioned 47th birthday, Wallace’s mother Voletta and his children Christopher Jordan and T’Yanna announced that Biggie’s hometown street, St. James Place, would officially be renamed “Christopher ‘Notorious B.I.G.’ Wallace Way” at the intersection of Fulton and St. James Place. From his 25-year-old Ready To Die hit “Juicy,” Smalls asked listeners to “spread love, it’s the Brooklyn way.” Now, Brooklyn returns the favor.

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Hours ago (June 10), marked the ceremonial unveiling of “Christopher ‘Notorious B.I.G.’ Wallace Way” the heart of B.I.G.’s stomping grounds. Leroy McCarthy, the man behind the naming of the Wu-Tang Clan district in Staten Island, Phife Dawg’s street in Queens, and a push for a Big Pun street coming to The Bronx, received approval votes of 48-0 from the New York City Council in favor of the name change last December.

Ms. Wallace and other members of Biggie’s family were present this afternoon. Lil’ Kim, along with other Junior M.A.F.I.A. affiliates were on hand, in addition to one of B.I.G.’s DJs, DJ Enuff were there.

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In an interview with Rolling Stone, McCarthy explained the symbolic nature behind his movement. “Honoring Biggie symbolizes more than just one man,” McCarthy said. “It symbolizes a culture. It symbolizes a borough. It symbolizes a people, and Hip-Hop is worldwide.”