Dr. Dre Put Compton On The Map. Now He’s Immortalizing Its Legacy (Album Stream)

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Announced just days ago, Dr. Dre’s third studio album, Compton, has released as planned. The N.W.A. co-founder named his first LP in nearly 16 years after the Hub City that he hails from. Now, the Beats By Dre namesake drops off the deeply-anticipated work to Apple Music for an exclusive window until the public release date tomorrow (August 7).

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As subscribers press play (and the rest wait impatiently for the clock to strike twelve), there is a lot to sift through, beyond the booming beats from one of modern music’s greatest composers. In some ways, the album represents a number of reunions. One week before Straight Outta Compton hits theaters, D-R-E teams up with Ice Cube (“Issues”) in the latest of a 25-year stretch of reconciliations and hiatuses. Perhaps the most unusual guest on Compton is another former Ruthless Records artist, Cold 187um (a/k/a Big Hutch) from Above The Law, with whom Dre worked on Livin’ Like Hustlers. Before Eminem and Kendrick Lamar (who also appear), Dre’s protege was Snoop Dogg—who is featured (“One Shot Kill”). Various past affiliates such as Xzibit and Marsha Ambrosius appear. Opposite the reunions, Dre has used Compton to introduce a crop of new talent. Most notably, Aftermath Entertainment’s Flint, Michigan MC Jon Connor appears. Also, 9th Wonder/Justus League affiliate King Mez, California native Anderson .Paak, and an artist named Justus (no relation to 9th and Khrysis’ aforementioned team) get the biggest look of their careers, thus far.

Perhaps Dre’s third (and purportedly final) solo album shows how the sense of Compton–the music, attitude, and dichotomy its offered pop culture–affected everybody. Whether from Flint, Philly, Pomona, Long Beach, or Detroit, Compton is in all of us—thanks to Dr. Dre (and his N.W.A. band-mates Eazy-E, Cube, MC Ren, and DJ Yella).

How does this album measure up to the “detox” following 16 years of anticipation?

Click here for the full stream of Compton: The Soundtrack via Apple Music.

Related: Dr. Dre, Nas, KRS-One, B-Real, Scarface & RBX Came Together In The Aftermath Of Coastal Conflict (Video)