Big Daddy Kane Tells The Story Of The Night He & Tupac Recorded Together (Video)

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Throughout the 1990s, Tupac Shakur and Big Daddy Kane maintained a friendship. It was during Kane’s 1993 Manhattan show that  ‘Pac and The Notorious B.I.G., with Scoob and Shyheim The Rugged Child, famously spit their iconic freestyles together.

However, Tupac and Kane would also record together. One song, reportedly titled “Too Late Playa” was recorded in 1996, less than one year before Shakur was murdered. As B.D.K. recently told Acton Entertainment, that recording also stemmed from a chance run-in at the March 16, 1996 Mike Tyson-Frank Bruno rematch fight at Las Vegas, Nevada’s MGM Grand.

“The night I did a song with Tupac, it was cool. It’s real funny, because of the way it came about. We were actually in Las Vegas at a [Mike] Tyson fight. We were sittin’ around talkin’ about doing something together. Suge Knight was like, ‘Why don’t y’all stop talking about it and go ahead and do this shit, man. Y’all can fly back tonight, and be back here tomorrow.” The fight would end in a Tyson TKO victory. That prompted Kane and ‘Pac to get to work. “And we got on a plane, left Vegas, went back to L.A. to Death Row’s [Can-Am] Studios and me and ‘Pac recorded a song. Me, ‘Pac, and [MC] Hammer recorded a song. And then I wrote a song for Hammer that he recorded.”

It appears there may be multiple recordings, given the new information surrounding Hammer. At the time, the Oakland, California star MC was signed to Knight’s label, recording a never-to-be-released album called Too Tight. Here is one presumed bootleg of the song, which also features R&B artist Danny Boy:

The other recording is believed to be the funky “Wherever You Are,” by Tupac and Kane:

Related: Big Daddy Kane Reveals KRS-One Is The Battle He Really Wanted & Why It Never Happened (Video)

In the same December interview, Kane recalls Quincy Jones introducing him to Jazz legend Ella Fitzgerald. Ella would pass away in 1996. The MC also discusses the name-change of his upcoming film, and the hardships of leaving Warner Bros. Records for MCA Records in the ’90s.

Related: Big Daddy Kane Returns To Acting, Opposite Keanu Reeves In This Trailer (Video)