In A World Filled With Hate Audio Push Spread Love (Video)

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Next month, Audio Push will be releasing their first studio album after releasing more than ten mixtapes. Representing Southern California’s Inland Empire (a region which houses, among others, the cities Ontario, Riverside, and San Bernardino), the duo comprised of Oktane and Price has given its September 23 LP the title of 90951, which sounds like a zip code but which is in fact a merging of their respective area codes, 909 and 951. Earlier this summer, they shared their love for the old school in the form of “Check the Vibe,” a feel-good Hip-Hop homage to some of the pioneers of that genre, A Tribe Called Quest.

Audio Push Redefine What’s Regular In “Normally” (Video)

But today (August 31), Audio Push drops a video for a song entirely their own, and in fact is in many ways an entirely new sound. “Spread Love” (which features Eric Choice) is buoyant but not airy, and delivers a substantive message delivered from a different perspective than much of the duo’s former work. As Price rhymes in the song’s first verse, “radio won’t play this shit no’ mo’, the DJs gon’ say ‘they switched the flow’/’Add more bars, rap about trap, maybe open it up’/Fuck that, maybe yo’ minds ain’t open enough.” With references to violence, not only in places like Iran but also on the block, the song is a plea for the spreading of love, but unlike in Biggie’s version, this time it’s the I.E. way.

In the Chris Scholar-directed video, cues are taken from midcentury popular culture, from the cars to the fashion, but only when the two appear on screen. This is in addition to what appears to be vintage news footage of protest movements, and the use of a 1950s style T.V. set to frame many of its scenes. At all other times, the video is set in contemporary suburbia, as if to suggest Audio Push is relaying a message that harkens back to the Civil Rights Era but which is painfully relevant still, in 2016.

Heads can learn more about Audio Push’s vision for 90951 by peeping the album’s video trailer.