YG, G-Eazy & Macklemore Unite In an Effort to Trump Hate (Video)

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In the April video for “FDT,” YG and Nipsey Hussle open with a question for their audience: “in which direction will we go?” It’s a pointed reference to the presidential election, one in which the political arena has become more divisive and fraught with implications than most in recent history. As the “FDT” video mentions in its opening sequence, the eight years of the Obama presidency have resulted in some major progress, namely in prison reform and healthcare, two issues particularly relevant in disadvantaged communities. “Separation is the enemy,” it’s stated in the video, suggesting that the only way to combat a Donald Trump presidency is to take measures towards unification.

YG opted to take a big step towards that goal when he enlisted G-Eazy and Macklemore for “Fuck Donald Trump (Part 2).” As reported by Ambrosia for Heads, YG said in a recent interview with Vice that he specifically chose the two rappers because “[t]hey’re the two biggest white rappers in the game,” adding that if he made an anti-Trump record with White artists, “that shit is gonna mean something.” And yes, while the lyrics to the remix are spectacularly potent, the images in its newly released video are even more so, and they lend much to the notion that a united, multiracial front may really trump hate.

Not only do the three MCs appear in the video (which is given the same fitting black-and-white approach as the original version’s video), but groups of Trump protesters are included in a powerful depiction of the youthful political activism happening across the country. Even Trump Tower makes an appearance, a once gleaming example of American entrepreneurship at its finest, and now a de-facto HQ for groups eager to ruin the Trump reputation for good. But the video’s most enduring powerful inclusion is that of massive crowds repeating the song title in unison.

Bombastic and explosive as they may be, “FDT”and its remix are at the very least eliciting conversations, much like the one that happens at the very end of today’s video. The question is, will those conversations translate into voter participation come November?