Run-D.M.C. Tells 2 Retail Giants “You Be Illin'” & Sues Them For $50 Million

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Hi. We recently created AFH TV, Ambrosia For Heads’ streaming video service, because we believe real Hip-Hop deserves its own dedicated TV home, but we need your help to make it great. Please subscribe to AFH TV. It is only $1.99/month or $12/year, and already features some amazing content, but the best is yet to come. Thank you for all of your support.

Run-D.M.C. are not only music icons, they are kings of fashion. D.M.C., Rev Run, and the late Jam Master Jay helped Hip-Hop portrayed on stage, film, and music video in accessible street wear, not costuming. The Hollis, Queens trio brought the track-suit, the leather jacket, Cazal eye-wear, Adidas sneakers and apparel, and flat brimmed black hats to the mainstream. With it, the Profile Records act’s logo also became an icon. Before G-Unit, Rocawear, or Akoo denim, the red, black, and white “Run-D.M.C.” logo became Hip-Hop merchandising.

rundmc_tshirt

In 2016, Run-D.M.C. believes their logo and image are being wrongfully used. According to TMZ, the group is suing Wal-Mart and Amazon to the tune of $50 million. Beyond simply t-shirts, the lawsuit reportedly accuses retailers of illegally placing the logo on glasses, hats, t-shirts, patches, and wallets.

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Previously, Run-D.M.C. struck a seven-figure deal with Adidas, who has officially partnered with the Rock & Roll Hall of Famers for decades.

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In the 2000s, a contemporary of Run-D.M.C., The Fat Boys, were among the 1980s Hip-Hop groups who licensed their logo to retailers. That trio worked in tandem with Urban Outfitters, who also sells merchandise related to Death Row Records, Tupac Shakur, and Bone Thugs-n-Harmony, among others.