Meek Mill’s Blueprint For A Comeback Is Music With A Powerful Message (Video)

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Hi. We recently created AFH TV, Ambrosia For Heads’ streaming video service, because we believe real Hip-Hop deserves its own dedicated TV home, but we need your help to make it great. Please subscribe to AFH TV. It is only $1.99/month or $12/year, and already features some amazing content, but the best is yet to come. Thank you for all of your support.

Since initiating a high-profile battle-beef with Drake in 2015, Meek Mill’s career has been distinctly different than before. The Philly MC suffered a well-publicized breakup with Nicki Minaj, landed up in another high-profile beef with The Game (plus Beanie Sigel), and also entered his thirties. Once a gold-certified, #1 artist, the MMG mainstay remained active, but was cast in a different light than his late 2000s/early 2010s boom. In the eyes of many, Meek Mill is a man down.

Meek Mill Breaks His Silence On Drake, Game & Beans. He Has A LOT To Say. (Audio)

The just-released “YBA (Young Black America)” is an example of Meek’s message-focused side, and his newfound wisdom. The same day the song (assisted by The-Dream) releases, the Dreamchasers founder unleashes its video. There is plenty of symbolism in the Spike Jordan-directed visual. Meek exits his luxury car to talk to a young, long-haired kid hustling outside the law (perhaps representing a young Meek). The older, walking success story gives the youth jewels for the mind, before his D.C. chain. The notion of chasing dreams is more than just branding, at a time when killings, hate crimes, and the gaps in opportunity are rising. Dreams may be all this young man has, even if he’s going about reaching them the wrong way. From a Native American “dream catcher” in one shot, to images of the Ku Klux Klan in others, the vid closely traces Meek’s lyrics:

The official song’s track is identical to JAY-Z’s Blueprint bonus closer, “Blueprint (Momma Loves Me).” In his moment of clarity Meek raps about what he believes to be society’s ills: “White man kill the Black man / They never report us / Black man kill the white man / They gon’ start a war up.” The MC who served a prison stint ahead of his thriving career has seen many sides of the world, and made something out of nothing. At this juncture in his career, he gives up game to one of his followers (possibly his former self) on how to get them.

Meek Mill’s Blues Bring Out The Best In His Music (Video)

Towards the close of the video, there is footage of Donald Trump telling the Black Community how he sees them—as failing, with bad schools, no jobs, and a detached youth. Like the police cameras monitoring the block from above, dreams are hard to come by in the video’s environment. As the KKK is revealed to be Black men, not white, the protagonist runs for his life, and for his dream, armed with knowledge and a medallion of hope.

According the video credits, this is a single to Mill’s upcoming Wins & Losses album. This will be his third official solo LP, following 2015’s #1 Dreams Worth More Than Money.