Big K.R.I.T. Kicks The Freestyle Of His Career & One Of The Year’s Best (Video)

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Big K.R.I.T. is underrated. Over the last seven years, he has given Hip-Hop some of its finest moments. His mixtapes K.R.I.T. Wuz Here and Return of 4eva were among the best in their respective years. 2012’s “Mt. Olympus” was arguably the most potent response record to Kendrick Lamar’s “Control” verse that, to many, coronated Kendrick as the king of his generation. 2014’s Cadillactica was an album with a collection of tracks that were unskippable, and which has only gotten better over time. And, K.R.I.T.’s performance at the 2016 BET Hip Hop Awards was one of the most powerful the show has ever seen. Despite it all, K.R.I.T. is rarely mentioned in conversations about the best MCs of his generation.

Perhaps, in no forum is that more the case than freestyling. Artists like Kendrick Lamar, Logic, Joey Bada$$, Vic Mensa and King Los are frequently praised for their ability to kick a penetrating verse. By contrast, K.R.I.T. is almost never cited for his ability to shine when asked to wreck the mic. However, on yesterday’s L.A. Leakers show, K.R.I.T. kicked the freestyle of his career, and one of the best of the year.

Over the last few weeks, K.R.I.T. has offered up verses for Sway, Bootleg Kev and other platforms, but for the LA Leakers, he goes to a different level. Flowing over the “Imaginary Player” track that Prestige produced for JAY-Z in 1997, he unleashes a verse that is both artful and substantive. He addresses his issues with former label, Def Jam, his response to Kendrick Lamar, fair-weather friends, life’s ups and downs, and more, continuing for more than five minutes. At four-and-a-half minutes in, after a beat change, he picks up the tempo and the aggression. He also shows he’s fully aware of his status to many, rapping, “Ni**as talking Top 5 like I ain’t even here.

Last week, Big K.R.I.T. released a double album, 4eva Is A Mighty Long TimeIt’s yet another reason why K.R.I.T. deserves to be in the conversation.