Joell Ortiz & Fred The Godson Roar Like Godzilla In An Ode To New York (Audio)

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Hi. We recently created AFH TV, Ambrosia For Heads’ streaming video service, because we believe real Hip-Hop deserves its own dedicated TV home. But, there are doubters, so, we need your help. If you have enjoyed anything on AFH over the last 7 years, we are asking you to subscribe to AFH TV. It is only $1.99/month or $12/year, and already features some amazing content, but the best is yet to come. Thank you for all of your support.

At the Y2K pinnacle of Rawkus Records, Pharoahe Monch eclipsed his Organized Konfusion success with an onslaught of solo hits. The first cut was probably the deepest, thanks to “Simon Says.” The Queens, New York MC/producer used the Godzilla theme in a beat that transcended single, into an all-out club banger during the height of NYC clubs like The Tunnel. The song snuck into the Top 100, ahead of a sample suit that halted one of Rawkus’ early crossover darts.

Shortly after that time, “Jo-ell Quickman” was one of the newer Big Apple MCs cutting his teeth and tracks for Rawkus. He released the “How They Do” 12″, and followed it up with an appearance on Kool G Rap’s The Giancana Story LP for the label. By the end of the 2000s, Joell was revered as one of the city’s elite spitters, thanks to cult-lauded indie LPs.

In 2017, Ortiz, like Monch, has become a purebred lyricist with crossover appeal. One-fourth of Shady Records’ Slaughterhouse, the Brooklyn native tackles the same sample that Monch and Lee Stone freaked in 1999. “Talk Dat” features Bronx MC Fred The Godson, and is all about reviving New York City Rap, as they know and love it. Rather than full verses from each, the “Tell ‘Em” duo trade bars with synergy. The interplay is conversational. The lyricists wax wordplay about traveling to Grecian getaways, flippin’ packs, and putting muscle cars in the garage. Despite all of those images, each rapper finds a way to keep it gully, in explaining why those achievements are so New York.

“Talk Dat” is produced by Heatmakerz, of Dipset fame. They worked extensively with Ortiz on 2014’s House Slippers.