Eminem’s New Song Is A Scathing Rebuke Of Racism & White Privilege (Audio)

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Hi. We recently created AFH TV, Ambrosia For Heads’ streaming video service, because we believe real Hip-Hop deserves its own dedicated TV home. But, there are doubters, so, we need your help. If you have enjoyed anything on AFH over the last 7 years, we are asking you to subscribe to AFH TV. It is only $1.99/month or $12/year, and already features some amazing content, but the best is yet to come. Thank you for all of your support.

For the second time in 2 months, Eminem has delivered some of the most potent commentaries in music. In October, his BET Hip Hop Awards Cypher, a freestyle titled “The Storm” that was a 5-minute takedown of Donald Trump, became headline news around the world. Em was not the first artist to criticize Trump, but he was one of the biggest and, as a White artist on a platform featuring content aimed at Black audiences, it was an incredibly bold statement.

Now, after the introspective single “Walk On Water,” featuring Beyoncé, Em returns with another scathing critique of where we are as a society. “Untouchable” finds Em turning his razor sharp pen on racism, specifically, racism by Whites against Blacks. In his first verse, he speaks from the perspective of a White police officer who demonstrates a complete lack of understanding and compassion for the Black citizens that he systematically targets. As he continues, he has incisive insights about the irony of events like the shooting of police officers in Dallas overshadowing the entire Black Lives Matter movement and also points out the ignorance of people who question things like the existence of “Black” neighborhoods, for not taking the time to understand underlying dynamics like the segregation that lead to those circumstances.

It is clear from both “The Storm” and “Untouchable,” that Em has zero concern about alienating his fan base that is largely comprised of White males, presumably a fair amount of whom are Trump supporters and who hold the views the MC attacks in “Untouchable.” As he did at the end of “The Storm,” he is drawing a line on this latest song and either people stand with him or they stand against him.