Finding The GOAT Group: Geto Boys vs. Goodie Mob. Who Is Better?

Hip-Hop Fans, please subscribe to AFH TV, a streaming video service focused on real Hip-Hop culture. We already have exclusive interviews, documentaries, and rare freestyles featuring some of Rap’s most iconic artists and personalities, and much more is coming--movies, TV series, talk shows. We need your support. It is only $1.99/month or $12/year, and is available on iOS, Android, Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire and Google TV, for all subscribers. Start your 30-day free trial now. Thank you.

“Finding the GOAT Group,” the fourth installment of Ambrosia For Heads’s annual battle series features Hip-Hop’s greatest collectives vying for the #1 spot. Sixty-two groups have been pre-selected by a panel of experts, and one slot will be reserved for a wild-card entry, including the possibility for write-in candidates, to ensure no deserving band of MCs and DJs is neglected. The 2018 contest consists of seven rounds, NCAA basketball-tournament style, leading to a Top 32, then the Sweet 16 and so on, until one winner is determined. For each battle, two groups are pitted against one another with a ballot to decide which one advances to the next round. Though there will be an enormous amount of debate in comments, on social media, in barbershops and text messages, which we encourage, only votes cast in the official ballot or those using the official hashtags on social media count.

This heavyweight bout of southern outfits pins the H-Town’s Geto Boys against the ATL’s Goodie Mob. Two great groups with influence spanning decades do battle. Your vote may decide the victor in this southern showdown.

Geto Boys

One of the pioneering Southern Rap groups, the Geto Boys have undergone personnel changes throughout their 30-plus-year legendary career, but is best known as the trio of Scarface, Bushwick Bill, and Willie D. The Houston, Texas-based group’s knack for realist rhymes, particularly Face’s ability to tell tales of struggle, fear and triumph bridged the gap between Gangsta Rap and reflective songwriting. Between the late ’80s and the mid-2000s, the GB’z stood as a trusted brand in music, making music always viewed as underground by media standards, which still could achieve platinum and gold status. 2005’s The Foundation showed that the chemistry was intact in the studio (and on the road). These artists that wanted solo careers from the very beginning may still do some shows together, but there are no more albums on the horizon. Including past and interim members Big Mike, DJ Ready Red, Sire Jukebox, as well as Prince Johnny C, the group has written its history adhering to the G-code.

Goodie Mob

The deep-fried soulful sway of Goodie Mob became heavily influential in Atlanta, Georgia during the 1990s. Along with affiliates OutKast and mentors Organized Noize, they laid the groundwork for a city that eventually took over modern-day Hip-Hop culture. Their debut LP Soul Food is a perfect example of how CeeLo Green, Big Gipp, Khujo, and T-Mo relayed tales of the hardships of being from the inner-city. They also, perhaps more uniquely, described being the victims of racism and taught of the ills of gentrification and police brutality that threatened their neighborhood. The Mob was political and soulful, skilled at rapping and singing. This quartet possessed the charms of the south, without being afraid to confront its complicated history. After some lineup challenges since the 1990s, recent material shows that the Mob is back in full force (see: 2013’s Age Against The Machine), and the music sounds goodie.

Finding The GOAT Group: Eric B. & Rakim vs. Salt-N-Pepa. Who Is Better?

So who is the better Hip-Hop group? Make sure you vote above.