Scott Storch Explains His Role On Dr. Dre’s 2001 & Defends Dre’s Production Contributions (Video)

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Hi. We recently created AFH TV, Ambrosia For Heads’ streaming video service, because we believe real Hip-Hop deserves its own dedicated TV home, but we need your help to make it great. Please subscribe to AFH TV. It is only $1.99/month or $12/year, and already features some amazing content, but the best is yet to come. Thank you for all of your support.

Scott Storch’s documentary Still Storch reveals a lot of things about the producer. On the surface, the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania native is talented and was able to use his ability as a musician to create some of the biggest hits of the late ’90s and 2000s. He also let the fortune he earned from his talent pay for a lifestyle that would eventually make him broke and remove him from being a prevalent “super-producer.”

Appearing on The Breakfast Club, the former member of The Roots jokes that so many people see him as “a drug addict douche-bag.” However, in describing his years in Philly, Scott (who says that he has always been the bread-winner for his extended family) illustrates that he has done generous things for others.

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During the 1980s, the Hilltop Hustlers Crew was a key component of Philly’s Hip-Hop scene. The collective was comprised of Cool C and Steady B, as well as Mentally Gifted, and later, Da Youngsta’s. It also included an MC trio called Three Times Dope. EST fronted the crew (including Chuck Nice and Woody Wood) that was eventually distributed by RCA Records. Even after their larger run, 3-D and EST stayed active in the Philly Rap community. Toward the end of Storch’s Breakfast Club interview, he revealed how he looked out for EST during the early 2000s, in a period during which Storch says his buddy was “struggling.”

“I ended up convincing Beyoncé back in the day that [EST] was an accomplished R&B writer, and he never wrote nothing [for any singers]; I just knew he was struggling,” Storch tells Charlamagne Tha God and Angela Yee. The Destiny’s Child lead, at work on her would-be debut, accepted Storch’s suggestion. “He came in and wrote all those songs on Dangerously In Love with me.”

EST, born Robert Waller, is credited with assisting Storch on the songs “Naughty Girl,” “Baby Boy,” and “Me, Myself and I,” all three of which would end up being singles on the album. It would eventually change Waller’s life as the royalties would provide him cash for a lifetime, but also, the connection helped him land a Grammy nomination for writing Destiny’s Child’s 2005 hit “Cater 2 U.” Dangerously In Love has sold more than five million copies in the United States alone.

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Storch later acknowledged that Beyoncé “knows the story” surrounding the songs he produced with EST, but it seemed to all work out in the end. Also during his Breakfast Club interview, Scott Storch detailed some of his most ridiculous purchases while he was rich and claims he blew through $100 million. He also revealed that he is currently in the process of getting back in the studio with Dr. Dre. During the middle of the conversation, Storch recalls Eve introducing him to D-R-E, based on their friendship during the mid-’90s in Philly. Storch later thanked the Ruff Ryders’ First Lady (with Dr. Dre) with the beat to “Let Me Blow Ya Mind.”

Storch also clarified his role on Dre’s 2001. “When we did [2001], I damn near did the whole album with him. But he and Mel-Man had produced that whole album; that was the agreement. You have to start somewhere and earn your stripes. So I went down as like the writer of a lot of these songs, instead of the producer per se. As I grew with Dre, after that album, immediately it was ‘co-produced by Scott Storch.'” At 15:00, Storch defends Dr. Dre’s production contributions. “Dre is…listen, he’s very hands-on. He’s a very technical dude. I’ll see that dude come into the studio with EQ’s and crazy compressors from the ’70s—sh*t that people don’t know about. He’s a genius. He programs the beats. All of the stuff that we’ve done together, he’s orchestrated. Say, me and this [bassist/guitarist/keyboardist] Mike Elizondo…he would listen to us play over these drum tracks that he made. He would be able to identify what is the hottest stuff we’re playin’. He’d be like, ‘Yo, that’s it.’ He could articulate what he wanted. He knew how to bring the best out of us but pushin’ the bar over the top.”

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Elsewhere in the interview, Storch details being neighbors with Suge Knight and what that entailed.

Still Storch is available to stream on Ambrosia For Heads.

#BonusBeat: “The Greatest Man Alive” by Three Times Dope: