Elzhi & Ace Clark Rap A Story Of Betrayal. This Is Master Storytelling From Two Gifted MCs

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Ace Clark is a triple threat from Brooklyn, New York who has got some impressive co-signs within his short time in the game. This MC/singer/producer dropped his debut The Good Fight back in 2015. He has taken his time crafting his follow-up, Black Privilege, but it will finally drop next Friday, September 14. He composed the whole 14-track affair, even using his own vocals pitched down in the production. And while Ace does have a couple of big-name guests on his sophomore, he has just as many homies and up-and-comers.

Heads will have likely already peeped the lead single from Black Privilege, “Signs,” which features venerated lyricists Talib Kweli and Joell Ortiz (and premiered at Ambrosia For Heads), but he’s now followed that soulful joint up with an even more impactful display of his skills, “Maxine.” This one is a story of betrayal many can relate to…at least in some form or fashion. The song is a back-and-forth conversation between best friends as one admits to having slept with the other’s girlfriend.


Elzhi & Nick Grant Hold A Master Class In Storytelling (Audio)

Elzhi does not just contribute a guest verse here; he plays the part of the foul friend. He tries to defend his position and asks for understanding, “We did our thing / Before she ever claimed you king / Thought it would be a fling / Now you talking about exchanging rings / I see y’all starting to gel too / Don’t think I don’t have a heart / I just didn’t have the heart to tell you.” A.C. reacts as any man would, he wilds out a bit, “You expect me to just take it in stride? / Let it slide? / A true brother would have swallowed his pride / Pulled me aside / If it was in the past, should have made it clear from jump / Right now, I want to take the air out your lungs.

Hard boom bap snares snapping over languid keys defines the chilled out sound here. And the way T-Storm cuts up Slick Rick saying, “Part of your heart’s been stolen,” really adds another dimension of flavor. This one is an anthem for dudes done wrong by close homies, but Heads, in general, will appreciate the top-notch storytelling and smooth production.