Cormega Makes Yet Another Industry Remix, With Inspectah Deck, Roc Marciano & Brand Nubian (Audio)

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After a show-stopping original version, Cormega remixed his Mega Philosophy single “Industry” with Juice Crew alumni Kool G Rap, Craig G, and Masta Ace in late July. For early October, Cory does it again. The third mix of “Industry” includes two-thirds of Brand Nubian in Sadat X and Lord Jamar, Wu-Tang Clan’s Inpectah Deck, and ‘Mega’s M.A.R.S brethren, Roc Marciano.

All of these MCs know a little somethin’-somethin’ about industry ugliness.

While he was a linchpin in Enter The Wu-Tang, Rebel I.N.S caught a raw deal in his solo efforts, between lacking the push reserved for Method Man and Ol’ Dirty Bastard, as well as having his original Uncontrolled Substance sessions lost in a RZA basement flood back in 1997. With some troubled luck, the Bronx-born lyricist has never seen the solo career his skills and writing deserves.

Roc Marciano, although emerging as one of the strong independent voices of 2010s Hip-Hop, could have/should have been on in the late ’90s, after running with the Carson Daly-backed U.N. and Busta Rhymes’ Flipmode Squad. Instead, it was through his late to market debut, Marcberg, recorded during Q-Tip’s Renaissance sessions in the lab, that the Hempstead, Long Island MC/producer got heard as he should have been.

Then there’s Lord Jamar and Sadat X. The Brand Nubian members never enjoyed the solo success of Grand Puba, and both MCs suffered for actions off the microphone. Sadat’s gun charges several years ago prevented the educator from further pursuing his non-musical career, while Jamar’s perceived-as-controversial views on race, religion, and sexuality have made far greater headlines in the last decade than his really dope music (look no further than 2006’s The 5% Album).

Cormega conducts this symphony of lived-in realness, and along the way, with a new verse (and new beat), may have stolen the show yet again. What do you think?

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Related: Cormega Breaks Down Themes Of Mega Philosophy, Solidifying Legacy, & Addresses Flow (Food For Thought Interview)