Get to Know the Kinder, Gentler Kanye West in this Candid Interview (Video)

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Hip-Hop Fans, we need your help...We recently launched AFH TV, a streaming video service focused on Hip-Hop culture. We already have exclusive interviews, documentaries, and rare freestyles featuring some of Rap’s most iconic artists and personalities. But, there is so much more to come--movies, TV series, talk shows--and we need your support to make it a reality. Please subscribe to AFH TV. It is only $1.99/month or $12/year, and offers 30-day free trials. Thank you.

On The Low End Theory, Q-Tip famously rapped about “the way things work in cycles.” That being said, Kanye West is hitting specific media spots, and doing complete 180’s from his late 2013 campaign. Once perceived as angry, arrogant, and easily aggravated during his post-Yeezus run, ‘Ye is righting his apparent wrongs, first with Charlamagne Tha God and The Breakfast Club, and now with BBC Radio 1’s Zane Lowe.

West seemed to trust Lowe with some of his interior monologue back in ’13. Those messages seemingly have shifted, though the intimate interview setting and style still yield some rare results. Specifically, the “Power” maker breaks down on camera—and while he covers his face, accepts the vulnerability and raw emotion.

As was the case with last week’s Stateside spot, West’s conversation moves all over, encompassing fashion, life outlook, music, and specific memories from question to question.

Much of the first 10 minutes of the interview is devoted to Adidas. The lover of product (and brands) spends less time talking about why he specifically loves about the German company, as much as how its Global Director Jon Wexler showed a belief in West as a man that other elite execs simply were not. Beyond money, it’s about trust and belief—and along the way, Kanye explains how he feels doubted, or merely reduced to a rapper in many meetings.

Around the 11:00 mark, Kanye West talks about amazing turning point moments in his life. He describes the recent shift into this floating creative (he doesn’t use “genius” this go-round). The icon compares the discovery, which perhaps led to his revised tone and outlook to when he wrote, “All Falls Down,” the College Dropout single that would shape his unique voice, role, and sound within Hip-Hop in the early 2000s. Rather than copy others (Jay Z, Common, Q-Tip), West found his own lane, and used it as a leap-pad.

The discussion moves into working with Paul McCartney, and a look at devoting one’s self fully to the music. West discusses what he’s trying to do with the upcoming album—though guarded on specifics. “Only One” is discussed throughout, for its importance to music and its writer.

Then things get emotional (25:00). Kanye West remembers a muse and an inspiration, Professor Louise Wilson. Talking about the pursuit of perfection and beyond, West recalls Wilson telling him a tip about raising North West. “As soon as they do anything halfway good—when they’re two and three years old, their parents clap. She looked at me and she said, ‘Kanye, don’t clap.'” The thought is not finished, as Kanye gets emotional on the absence of his friend, in a life that’s been greatly affected by tragedy.

As he did regarding Sir Paul, Zane interjects some of his own opinions. A Grammy nominated part of Sam Smith’s team, Lowe champions Beck, repeatedly, to West. Kanye asserts that he is a hypocrite about music, fashion, and everything else.

The interview closes with ‘Ye praising Drake (41:00). Although ‘Ye and Drizzy may have a misunderstood relationship, as collaborators and critics of each other (at times), West offers himself as a confidant, consultant, and collaborator to Drake—then explaining that he means “all of us,” likely meaning elite Rap peers. Then Mr. West offers some powerful advice to the YMCMB star.

As it were, the conversation seemingly prompted Kanye to fire up Twitter, make some apologies, and try to get some musical support from some of peers of his own:

Related: Kanye West Uses His Platform as a BET Visionary Honoree to Discuss Race and Classism (Video)