Lil Dicky Has Made An Epic Music Video…That Cost Almost No Money (Video)

Hi. We recently created AFH TV, Ambrosia For Heads’ streaming video service, because we believe real Hip-Hop deserves its own dedicated TV home. But, there are doubters, so, we need your help. If you have enjoyed anything on AFH over the last 7 years, we are asking you to subscribe to AFH TV. It is only $1.99/month or $12/year, and already features some amazing content, but the best is yet to come. Thank you for all of your support.
Hi. We recently created AFH TV, Ambrosia For Heads’ streaming video service, because we believe real Hip-Hop deserves its own dedicated TV home. But, there are doubters, so, we need your help. If you have enjoyed anything on AFH over the last 7 years, we are asking you to subscribe to AFH TV. It is only $1.99/month or $12/year, and already features some amazing content, but the best is yet to come. Thank you for all of your support.

Back in 1996, The Roots released their brilliant music video for “What They Do.” The video satirized the Rap visuals of the time, which were becoming increasingly filled with stereotypes and cliches like scantily-clad women, palatial mansions (that were typically rented), luxury vehicles (also rented), orgies and other completely fabricated debauchery. The Roots subtitled each of the shots to explicitly call out what they saw as the buffoonery of the paint by numbers videos. Rather than have a chilling effect on the fake flossy and bling era, the video stood out like a sore thumb as artists seemed to up the ante of just how big pimpin’ they could be. In fact, some videos in the twenty-teens make some of the more flamboyant videos of the 90s seem demure. So, how do you make a parody in a genre in which the absurd has become the standard? Enter Lil Dicky.

From his very first music video, “Ex-Boyfriend,” Dicky has shown that he will not hesitate to peel back the facades and look at the real, warts and all, through a comedic lens. Like many rappers and comedians, he often starts with himself, whether it be insecurities about a girlfriend’s ex and how he measures up or if he has what it takes to be an MC, and strips away conventional wisdom to show some of the absurdities we’ve come to accept in life. In his song “$ave Dat Money,” from his Professional Rapper album, he sets the uber-materialism in some Hip-Hop in his sights, and goes to work. Again, he starts with himself, noting his Jewish faith (with a nod to all the accompanying stereotypes) and raps not about how much he spends but the absurd lengths to which he will go to save a buck. Throughout, his commentary is bookended by Rich Homie Quan and Fetty Wap, who also know what their brands stand for (literally) and have senses of humor about it.

The visuals for “$ave Dat Money” take the themes of the song into overdrive. The rapper born David Burd is shown trying to hustle his way into homes, car dealerships, nightclubs and more, for free, in a quest to make the “most epic Rap video ever for no money.” There are the obligatory yachts and popped bottles and women in bikinis that have gotten even smaller…and all of it was obtained for free. The result is a hilarious send up of both himself and many of the stereotypes that have pervaded much of Hip-Hop of late, shot as part music video and part documentary. In addition to appearances by Fetty and Rich Homie, Dave gets cameos from Sarah Silverman, Mark Cuban, Hannibal Burress, Kevin Durant, T-Pain and more. In the end, his quest is fulfilled. Just watch.

Related: Lil Dicky Explains What Led Him to Hip-Hop In 5 Questions (Video)