Jay Z Locks In With Subliminal Shots. Only He’s Got The Keys. (Video)

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Jay Z is one artist who has been generous in giving hugely high profile songs to others’ albums. From records like the “Dear Summer” break of silence (and perceived subliminal shot at Game) on Memphis Bleek’s 534, to a “Diamonds From Sierra Leone (Remix)” verse for Kanye West addressing the Roc-A-Fella fallout, Hov’ often uses time between albums to speak the loudest. Lately, Shawn Carter has been on a tear, appearing on a remix to Fat Joe & Remy Ma’s “All The Way Up,” as well as Pusha T single “Drug Dealers Anonymous.” He keeps his three-month run in tact, with “I Got The Keys” from DJ Khaled’s upcoming Major Key LP (July 29). Quickly after the song, the video unleashes in black-and-white, with a lot of colorful bars.

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Alongside Future, Jay’s lyrics speak loudly—although not directly. As Joe Budden recently alludes to in his podcast, lines like the “In real life they like me? In real life I’m like ‘no,’” and ‘”Til you own your own you can’t be free / ‘Til you’re on your own you can’t be me” appear to address Drake’s “Summer Sixteen” line, “I used to wanna be on Roc-A-Fella then I turned into Jay / Now I got a house in L.A., now I got a bigger pool than ‘Ye.

This is the latest exchange in a storyline developing for more than two years. In February in 2014, Drake made some disparaging remarks (which he asserts were intended to be off the record) about his “Pound Cake/Paris Morton Music 2” collaborator. “It’s like Hov can’t drop bars these days without at least four art references,” Drake was quoting as saying. “I would love to collect [art] at some point, but I think the whole Rap/art world thing is getting kind of corny.” A month later, alongside Roc Nation artist Jay Electronica on the “We Made It Freestyle,” Jay Z apologized for offending “Miss Drizzy.”

Drake did not go quietly, at least in the eyes of fans. On “Draft Day,” which dropped a month after Jay’s reply, the OVO founder rapped, “I heard they talking crazy, I was out of town / You know they love to pop all that shit when I’m not around / But when I’m here, psst, not a sound / That’ll make me snap, jot it down / Get in the booth and lay a body down.” After interviews and name-calling, the tensions appeared to move into actual verse. Drake stayed at it too, putting a number of questionable lines into June, 2014’s hit, “0 To 100.”

Although Jay and Drake have worked together multiple times, Drizzy may be joining the ranks of (Drake’s mentor) Lil Wayne, Beanie Sigel, and Peedi Crakk for collaborator-turned-foe. In 2013, the pair worked together on several cuts.

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With Jay rapping especially confidently, it leaves others to speculate if other bars in the We The Best song are barbed for anyone special. Reminding the world that Beyonce his wife, he’s been nonstop since ’96, and he’s never lost, the Roc Nation honcho puts his stats up against anybody who wants it.

As Drake got a six-minute diss diatribe from Joe Budden last week, the Cash Money Records superstar may have a few opponents in the July heat. It may take some more “summer sixteens” to silence the officiating from the fans.

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In addition to Jay, Future, and Khaled, Swizz Beatz, Rick Ross, T.I., Busta Rhymes, Yo Gotti, and A$AP Ferg are among those in the prison-release themed video.

Major Key marks Khaled’s first album since signing (along with his label) to Epic Records.