MC Hammer Shows He Can Still Hurt ‘Em With His Dance Moves At Age 55 (Video)

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Hi. We recently created AFH TV, Ambrosia For Heads’ streaming video service, because we believe real Hip-Hop deserves its own dedicated TV home. But, there are doubters, so, we need your help. If you have enjoyed anything on AFH over the last 7 years, we are asking you to subscribe to AFH TV. It is only $1.99/month or $12/year, and already features some amazing content, but the best is yet to come. Thank you for all of your support.

At the height of his popularity in the early 90s, MC Hammer was one of the most polarizing figures in Hip-Hop. His immense success was both the source of ridicule and respect. His third album, 1990’s Please Hammer, Don’t Hurt ‘Em, spent an astounding 21 weeks at the top of the Billboard 200 chart and has sold a mind-boggling 22 million copies.

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For some, the business acumen that allowed the man born Stanley Burrell to take Hip-Hop to the mainstream and become the biggest star on the planet made Hammer one of Hip-Hop’s shining role models. For others, his shiny clothes, simplified cadence, flashy moves and big pop songs watered down the culture that was being driven by names like Rakim, Big Daddy Kane, EPMD and LL Cool J, at the time. Years later, his epic fall, both financially and in popularity, ended the discussion about him, entirely.

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As time has passed, however, Hammer’s legacy has seen a resurgence. The feats that he achieved in his sales and business dealings inspired a generation of would be moguls, such as Master P, Birdman and Sean Combs. Revelations about his toughness, from respected Hip-Hop veterans, such as Redman, also showed that, despite the parachute pants, Hammer was too legit. And now, at the age of 55 years young, Hammer shows that he can still very much hurt ’em with his moves.

Yesterday, video surfaced of Hammer dancing in a studio, and he is getting busy. According to TMZ, the Bay Area legend was rehearsing a routine for a friend’s TV show. While the baggy pants may be gone, Hammer’s shine is still very much intact. The video starts at about 30 seconds in.