J. Cole Saves His Best Verse Of The Year For A Collabo With Rapsody (Audio)

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J. Cole is on an incredible run in 2018. April’s KOD album is a top-tier contender for this year’s best albums. In an era marred by overdose and self-medication, the LP offers powerful commentary to millions of listeners that could benefit. Furthermore, infidelity, vanity, greed, and a generational chasm in Rap music are addressed with nimble bars that never feel like preaching. Apart from his #1 project, the Dreamville leader has not been stingy with dropping top-quality material on releases from peers. This batch of work includes spots on Royce 5’9’s The Book Of Ryan care of video single “Boblo Boat” (a visual Cole even directed). Additionally, Heads can find J’s verses on LPs by Bas, Cozz, Jay Rock, and 6LACK.

Today, Cole gives one of his best verses of the year to a peer who had one of ’17’s finest full-lengths: Rapsody. Along with its incredible lyrics, “Sojourner” is a buttery smooth track produced by 9th Wonder, who utilizes a classic breakbeat to give the joint that vintage vibe. This marks a big moment for North Carolina, as it unites the three of the most influential Hip-Hop artists ever to come out of the state.

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Cole sparks the song with a sung hook that complements the bass line. He then launches into arguably best guest verse of 2018, which tackles a number of the rapper’s personal issues and fears. His commentary is potent on a personal level, as well as in the genre of Rap: “Born into pain, alcoholic veins Over-analytical brain a product of the shame / And runnin’ from a past, that’s checkered like the game / Somewhere ‘long the way somebody snatched my peace and main / Maybe that’s the reason I spent decades seekin’ fame / And fortune hopin’ that a proper portion would contain / The sadness in my eyes, remember when I came In this music business, all their questions was insane / ‘Why you never smile in your pictures?’ I refrain / From givin’ you the answer ’cause that answer wasn’t plain / Enough for me to see ’cause at the time I knew my name / But didn’t know myself, and so I dealt with sh*t the same / As a fugitive, but running from the truth and sh*t, I shoot the sh*t with ni**as, but they never loop the sh*t that’s hidden deep / Within the crevices like ever since I was a child / Seen my mama with the pistol pointed at her dome and how / In the f*ck do you expect for me to ever be the best lil’ me / That I can be,” he raps.

Moments later, Cole spits, “Just heard these kids don’t know about Malcolm / And I’m sorta heart broken / ‘Cause our elders lost hope in / Our youth, and here I sit dead in the middle / Not a little / Boy no more, but not quite old yet / Waking up in cold sweats / Scared that I’m too disconnected from the kids perspective / The world ain’t got no patience for some sh*t that’s introspective.” Like 2018’s “FRIENDS” and “Motiv8,” this showing is fertile with life application.

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Never one to be outdone, Rapsody goes in after Cole with heavy words: “I got an Audi and it’s bad / I said that line ‘cause ni**as only respect you if you brag / It don’t work on me the same, don’t give a f*ck about what you have / Everybody claiming boss, know you ni**as don’t got no staff / It don’t measure up the same, what’s a quarter to a half / Of a whole lot of problems? Who taught you to add / Where I’m from we don’t recognize that as good math / If you don’t teach the ones that’s coming up to multiply their cash.” 9th drops out the drums for the beginning of Rapsody’s stanza. It is an effective method to accentuate this gifted MC’s words.

This song is the first glimpse from the Jamla Is The Squad 2 (November 9). The label compilation from 9th’s newest and most renowned imprint looks like it raises the stakes for the team. Busta Rhymes, Black Thought, Big K.R.I.T., Pharoahe Monch, J.I.D., David Banner, SiR, and Conway The Machine will collaborate with Jamla’s team. Since the first volume, the squad now includes Jericho Jackson (Elzhi & Khrysis) and Reuben Vincent.

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According to 2DopeBoyz, the Jamla Is The Squad 2 tracklist is as follows:

“Welcome to Jamroc” f. Reuben Vincent, Ian Kelly, Heather Victoria, GQ & Rapsody<
“Need to Exist” f. Actual Proof
“Crazy” f. Pharoahe Monch
“No False Moves” f. Reuben Vincent & GQ
“Machine & McQueen” f. Jericho Jackson & Conway
“Ya Heard Me” f. Don Flamingo
“Japan” f. Heather Victoria
“I Spy” f. King Draft & CJ Fly
“You Know I Gotta” f. Reuben Vincent
“Jumpin” f. Busta Rhymes
“Cojiba” f. Black Thought
“Good to Me” f. Amber Navran
“Do Something” f. Ian Kelly & Swank
“Sojourner” f. Rapsody & J. Cole
“Nothing Greater” f. SiR
“P.A.N.” f. GQ
“Shine” f. ThHappyHr
“Knocking At My Dope” f. Big K.R.I.T, Jakk Jo & David Banner
“Redblue” f. Rapsody & J.I.D
“One Love” f. Heather Victoria
“See It Through” f. Actual Proof
“Goodfellas” f. Niko Brim, Swank, Charlie Smarts, GQ & Rapsody

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Rapsody, Cole, and 9th Wonder are each currently included on Ambrosia For Heads‘ official playlist.

#BonusBeat: A recent TBD argument by Justin “The Company Man” Hunte why J. Cole’s KOD may already be the album of 2018: