Conway The Machine Is Back To Devour The Rap Competition On His New Album (Audio)

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The Griselda Records team is well known for its prolific output since the mid-2010s. In particular, Conway The Machine has solidified a position as one of the hardest out with his Everybody Is F.O.O.D. series of albums. After his Reject drops from years previous ingratiated him with Heads, the Buffalo, New Yorker decided it was time to establish his lyrical prowess on a higher level. He is already on his third volume of EIF and on this latest project he seems hungrier than ever.

While there are only eight tracks on Everybody Is F.O.O.D. 3, “La Maquina” brought the kind of potent bars that could fill prescriptions. On the opening song “EIF” the veteran MC immediately goes in. The way he flows over the heavy bassline is trademark Griselda, “These rappers trying to jump in my lane and copy style / But you too docile / Poppin’ choppers is not your style / Bust down the Cuban, my Dominican b*tch is chopping brown / In Spanish Harlem eating broccoli, they gave my ni**a, Badish, 40 when he got to trial / I just pray that he win that appeal and they knock it down / Let a ni**a get out of pocket now / I drop a bag and have a shooter knock him down while I watch a smile / A thousand for my belt / Murals in different countries without an album on the shelf / Already did it on my own, ni**a, now you wanna help? / I was broke and on the come up, I ain’t have nobody but myself.” The rhyme scheme is impressive, and more so in audio.


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Interestingly, The Machine has not revealed the producer credits yet. Nevertheless, Cookin Soul did post “London Pound” to his YouTube page to show that he was behind the beat. Meanwhile, the guest on the track is Taylor Gang affiliate, Berner. It’s worth noting that Conway does a little harmonizing on this cut. We also have to point out that the late Nipsey Hussle is honored with an interlude titled “Survival,” which features the Crenshaw rapper speaking on trying to move past the survival mode that is so prevalent in the hood.

The general brooding vibe on E.I.F.3 is partly conveyed by snippets of volatile interviews with 50 Cent and DMX. It’s clear that the “Grimiest Of All Time” is not feeling friendly as of late, but he does really open up on the last track, “Don’t Judge Me.” In the chorus, he admits he wears his emotions on his sleeve, speaks his mind at the wrong time, and recalls a few moral regrets. However, the adage “don’t judge lest you be judged,” seems to be the point. Griselda stays feeding the streets with a noteworthy release after a somber week in Rap.

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Earlier this week, Benny The Butcher collaborated with M.O.P. on Planit Hank’s “What Happened To The Streets?”