Big K.R.I.T. & Lil Wayne’s New Song Takes A Deep Dive Into A Form Of Addiction

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Throughout the ages, some great Hip-Hop music has been made about the topic of addiction. From The Roots’ “The Water” to Eminem’s “Going Through Changes,” J. Cole’s “Once An Addict,” to Royce 5’9’s “C*caine,” these songs are honest, vulnerable, and powerful hallmarks in all of the creators’ careers. Hip-Hop also loves its share of songs and references to the female anatomy. From A Tribe Called Quest’s “Electric Relaxation” to Kendrick Lamar’s “These Walls,” elite male MCs have found ways to pay tribute to the sacred place where all humans are created: the vagina.

Big K.R.I.T. has made a spectrum of songs about women. From breakout major label single “Money On The Floor” to 2017 highlight “1999,” Krizzle often uses dancers to be his muse. After all, the MC/producer inspired by UGK, OutKast, and 8Ball & MJG got some of his earliest recognition for making music for the str*p clubs. However, tracks like his feature on Erick Sermon’s “That Girl” present an artist that is willing to honor—not objectify—women.

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Second KRIT Iz Here (July 12) single “Addiction” builds on the latter thinking. Joined by Lil Wayne and Hayward, California’s Saweetie, the song is a pilgrimage, of sorts, to where we all come from, and where many are trying to go. The MCs use water and other liquids as symbolism to describe a substance that has them and so many others fiendin’.

Divin’ board, all aboard / Say it feel like water, I’ma be her waterboard / Better yet, her Aquaman, let me put my goggles on / I’ma go underwater, let me get my snorkel on,” begins Weezy in his second verse. Throughout his career, Wayne has taken similes and metaphors about sex and women’s bodies to the top of the charts. Here, he tries to do it again in the feature role.

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Addiction is the theme, as affirmed by a simple chorus. However, in a time where many artists are reconsidering how they rap about women, sex, and gender dynamics, K.R.I.T. and Wayne make no bones about who holds the cards in their relationships. Like Queen Latifah and Monie Love said 30 years ago, “Ladies first.”

Earlier this month, the Multi Alumni founder released his video for next month’s album title track.

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He has provided the tracklist to KRIT Iz Hereper HipHop-N-More, . Notably, the collection of songs includes several carryovers from early 2019’s TDT.

1) K.R.I.T. HERE
2) High End Country (Interlude)
3) Been Waitin
4) I Make It Easy
5) Addiction (Feat. Lil Wayne & Saweetie)
6) Energy
7) Obvious (Feat. Rico Love)
8) I Made (Feat. Yella Beezy)
9) Everytime (Feat. Baby Rose)
10) Believe
11) Prove It (Feat. J. Cole)
12) Family Matters
13) “Blue Flame” (Interlude)
14) Blue Flame Ballet
15) Learned From Texas
16) Outer Space
17) High Beams (Feat. WOLFE de MÇHLS)
18) Life In the Sun (Feat. Camper)
19) M.I.S.S.I.S.S.I.P.P.I.

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AFH TV has several interviews with Big K.R.I.T., including episodes of Where It All Began and Politics As Usual. We are currently offering free 30-day trials.