Throwback

Rakim speaks on his favorite verse in this interview. What’s yours?

SO many choices, but mine would be “I take 7 MCs put ’em in a line…”  You know the rest. Here’s the interview.

The 90’s will always be considered the Golden Age of hip-hop. Click below to listen to all 250 songs that XXL named the best of the 1990’s.

That’s not to say that decade will always be the best, nor that it contains the best year in hip-hop (in fact, read this if you REALLY want a debate)

Erick Sermon just dropped a new song and it inspired us to take a look back at his career. The latest Producer Series installment is dedicated to the Green Eyed Bandit.

When he first unleashed his sonic imprint in 1988 as part of EPMD, Erick Sermon was one of the first producers to bring P-Funk to hip-hop. Over the better part

All the recent heat around The Beastie Boys has gotten me thinking about Def Jam of old. You can’t talk about the original Def Jam sound without mentioning Rick Rubin. He is the subject of our latest Producer Series playlist.

Rick Rubin was a purist. He liked BIG thumping 808 drums, hard snares, hard rhymes and not much else on his songs. At the time, when rap was still being

DJ Quik’s new album drops next week. To support and show love, he is the subject of the latest Producer Series playlist.

Hailing from Compton, DJ Quik is one of the best producers to ever do it–on any coast–period.  He’s a DJ, a musician, a producer and a rapper.  Though his sound

Roy Ayers is a musical giant. His tracks have built some of the most important samples in hip-hop.

There’s a documentary coming out on Roy Ayers later in the year (great year for music documentaries, btw. With the amount of his music that has been sampled over the

Vado, Jadakiss and Ludacris take it back to the days when a track was hard drums and an even harder hand clap.

Here’s Check ‘Em Out. Click here to download.  Remember when these types of tracks used to be the standard for hip-hop? Check these out: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9s5DCRAAsyc

The movie Breakin’ introduced many to the West Coast break dancing scene but before Breakin’ there was the documentary Breakin’ N Enterin’.

Breakin’ N Enterin’ is a film from 1983 that documented the then nascent LA B-boy scene and inspired Breakin’.  It featured many of the players that went on to star

OutKast regularly get their props for being one of the greatest artists (of any genre) of all time, and rightfully so.

It’s seldom, however, that you hear about Organized Noize, the production team that played a key role in architecting the sonic foundation of OutKast’s early music, and that of other

Here’s a cool interview where Pharoahe Monch reflects on working with Nate Dogg to create the classic Oh No.

This was one of the few East Coast joints that Nate Dogg blessed. Sucker Free Here’s Oh No:

Two underground legends, Defari and Madlib, connect on Puro. Check out the video.

The Likwit Crew never got the props they deserved.  King Tee, Tha Alkaholiks and Xzibit were sikwidit. Here’s some of that Likwit goodness:

A couple of weeks ago, Nice & Smooth dropped a new video for a song that is 22 years old. Ironically, the song is called No Delayin’.

In celebration of the video, this week’s New World Auder (where Omar Akil re-arranges the tracks of an album for your listening pleasure) is of Nice & Smooth’s eponymous album.

New EPMD??? Yeah, that’s right…and it’s to the beat of The Breaks.

Check out Don’t Get Clapped. Click here to download.  And here’s Kurtis Blow’s The Breaks: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5KMrPDiw8PQ

The 2nd playlist of the week is some true old school. You will find nothing post-1988 here.

If names like Whodini, The Fat Boys, Eric B. and Rakim, LL Cool J, Ice-T, 2 Live Crew, Schooly D, Boogie Down Productions, Big Daddy Kane and Run-DMC mean something

Ever see the movie Wildstyle? It was the first hip-hop film ever.

While it was fiction, it plays almost like a documentary, transporting you back to 1983 for a look at the early days of hip-hop culture.  It covers all 4 elements

This week’s playlist is an ode to some of the G-Funk greats of the 90s. Some will be expected–Dre, Snoop, DJ Quik, Ice Cube–but there may be a couple of surprises that make your head nod a little harder.

I was catching up on some reading today and finally read the Wiz Khalifa article in the October 2010 issue of XXL magazine (the whole issue was incredible).  There was

How could I not post a new joint by Showbiz and KRS-ONE ? This one is called We Love This and also ft Fred Tha Godson

Click here to download.  And, here are a couple of classics from Showbiz and the blastmaster KRS-ONE: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDyYHIDJ1CQ.

Once again it’s the man with the master plan, they call him Sam and I think u better recognize. Here’s a “new” Sam Sneed joint called Lady Heroin.

Judging by the looks and sound of this however it’s much more likely an unreleased gem from the early 90’s.  Not mad at that though.  It was a classic era

It’s a slow day for new hip-hop so we take matters into our own hands. Check out this playlist of some classic joints.

Each Thursday night, we will be bringing you a different playlist to ease you into the weekend.  This week’s is full of old gems.  You’ll hear joints from Common, Wu-Tang

Ever debated what was the best year in hip-hop? Here’s a little something from The Rub to make the conversation a LOT more interesting. Check out these mixes of the best songs in hip-hop from 1979-2009, year by year….30 years of hip-hop. It gets no better.

These are courtesy of The Rub, one of the dopest DJ collectives around.  For 1979-1980, click here.  For 1981-1990, click here.  For 1991-2000, click here.  For 2001-2009, click here..

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My Mic Sounds Nice the new documentary from BET premieres on 8/30 at 10pm. It is one of the best hip-hop films ever.

If you are a fan of hip-hop, documentaries or just great TV, check out the premiere of My Mic Sounds Nice: A Truth About Women and Hip-Hop on BET at